Search
  • Bryan Fittin

How to Make Your LinkedIn Profile POP

Updated: Aug 5



Summary

In this episode of Rogue Creators, Bryan Fittin and Loren Lewis discuss creating a LinkedIn profile that stands out from the rest. They walk through each element of a profile, giving examples of how you can utilize each effectively. But wait – there’s more! Do you know what kind of content succeeds on LinkedIn? How do you get in front of your target audience? Don’t worry; Bryan and Loren also discuss that! This episode is chock-full of helpful tips, so you don’t want to miss it!



Shownotes

(1:44) What are you obsessed with?

(5:40) What makes a LinkedIn profile pop?

(7:14) Your headshot matters

(10:47) What does your headline say about you?

(13:35) Crafting your professional summary

(14:31) Recommendations and endorsements

(16:02) With LinkedIn, commenting is content!

(19:07) What content works on LinkedIn?

(24:52) Rapid Fire


Links

Bryan Fittin

Loren Lewis

EP36 with AJ Wilcox

Michaela Alexis



Quotes

“One thing that you do need to have is a professional headshot. That is one of those that you kind of stick out like a sore thumb in a very bad way if your headshot does not look good on LinkedIn.” (7:47)


“It’s just like any other social media platform – it’s a search engine. So, if you are trying to target specific people to connect with or potential clients, make sure that you are addressing their problem in your headline. That’s just another place to take advantage of that.” (12:29)


“Your professional summary is a place to kind of brag on yourself. Like, if you’ve worked really hard to get something, you should be able to showcase that. Don’t be embarrassed about that. Don’t shy away from it. And again, it establishes some clout for you and your position.” (14:18)


“Especially on LinkedIn, if you are just commenting on stuff – holy moly. It will show ‘Bryan commented on this, Bryan liked this, shared this,’ whatever it is. It is crazy to me how you can get in front of people who are following you.” (16:53)



“I will literally be on LinkedIn and I will just watch a three-minute video, which I would never do on Facebook or Instagram. It is a weird thing to actually get engaged with that type of content, but most of the time, I’m going [to LinkedIn] to learn. I’m going there to connect with other professionals. So it’s not just me going to be entertained or escape or something like that.” (19:21)


How are you using LinkedIn? Do you use it to connect with other professionals and establish yourself as a leader in your industry, or do you merely use it when you are on the job hunt? In the past, many saw LinkedIn as a tool for recruiting and finding new job opportunities, but it has evolved into a content-based platform where you can interact with potential clients and demonstrate your credibility to an audience. So, how can you maximize this platform to get the most out of LinkedIn?


In a recent episode of Rogue Creators, Bryan and Loren took listeners through a crash course on using LinkedIn effectively. From carefully crafting your profile to engaging with others’ posts and creating your own content, here’s everything you need to know!



Headshots That Show the Real You

While we often preach that LinkedIn is a great place to peel back the curtain and showcase some behind-the-scenes content, your headshot must be of professional quality. With that said, it doesn’t have to be a photo of you in formal business attire. So what makes for a good headshot?


One thing that you do need to have is a professional headshot. That is one of those that you kind of stick out like a sore thumb in a very bad way if your headshot does not look good on LinkedIn.” (7:47)



The keys to a good headshot are hiring a professional photographer and being yourself! A professional will be able to ensure the photo isn’t zoomed too far in or out, give you a good depth of field, and make you look good!

It’s up to you to make sure that you look like yourself. First, you must match your brand. Is your business relaxed around the office, or does your industry require that you wear formal business attire to the office? Your headshot should portray the way you will look when someone books a call with you!


Headlines That Solve Problems

Your headline is a great place to explain a bit of who you are and what you do! Often, the headline is used to communicate someone’s job title, but it should be much more than that. Briefly mention the problems you are solving and what your purpose is. Use this as an opportunity to make yourself searchable!



It’s just like any other social media platform – it’s a search engine. So, if you are trying to target specific people to connect with or potential clients, make sure that you are addressing their problem in your headline. That’s just another place to take advantage of that.” (12:29)


Crafting Your Professional Summary

Your professional summary can act as an extension of your headline. Take the liberty of expanding on the problems you solve and how you do it. It’s acceptable to brag about yourself in this section – You should be proving your authority in your position.’

Your professional summary is a place to kind of brag on yourself. Like, if you’ve worked really hard to get something, you should be able to showcase that. Don’t be embarrassed about that. Don’t shy away from it. And again, it establishes some clout for you and your position.” (14:18)



Recommendations and Endorsements

The recommendations and endorsements portion is often the most neglected part of a LinkedIn profile, but it could be the most likely thing to push a potential client to work with you. It is entirely fair to ask your favorite clients to write a short recommendation or endorsement for your profile! Similarly, don’t forget to do the same for others when they perform well for your business!


Commenting Is Content

One of the best things about LinkedIn is how easy it is to generate content and engage with your audience. LinkedIn sets itself apart from other platforms by highlighting your engagements on other users’ content. You constantly see notes on your feed about how someone you follow commented on another person’s post.



Especially on LinkedIn, if you are just commenting on stuff – holy moly. It will show ‘Bryan commented on this, Bryan liked this, shared this,’ whatever it is. It is crazy to me how you can get in front of people who are following you.” (16:53)


It’s easy to get in front of people through this platform, and you might be falling behind if you aren’t taking advantage of this feature! Rather than creating content multiple times a week for LinkedIn, you can simply post a few comments that add value to others’ posts to supplement your own content creation.


Content That Works on LinkedIn

Another thing that sets LinkedIn apart from other platforms is the types of content that are successful. Here at Go Rogue X, we like to joke that LinkedIn likes whatever style of content was popular on Facebook two years ago, but here’s the deal: it’s true.

While all other popular social media platforms are rushing towards extremely short-form videos that include many attention-grabbing animations and aesthetically pleasing themes, popular LinkedIn posts look entirely different.



I will literally be on LinkedIn and I will just watch a three-minute video, which I would never do on Facebook or Instagram. It is a weird thing to actually get engaged with that type of content, but most of the time, I’m going [to LinkedIn] to learn. I’m going there to connect with other professionals. So it’s not just me going to be entertained or escape or something like that.” (19:21)


On LinkedIn, you can post wide-form videos that are a few minutes long and have large, block-centric font headings and see a ton of success and engagement. With users headed to the platform for professional development and education, great content is bound to look much different than it does on platforms that people use for entertainment and escaping.

How will you use LinkedIn to promote yourself and your business this week?